Table of Contents


A Message from the Honourable Dr. Helena Jaczek, Minister of Community and Social Services

On behalf of the Ontario government, I am pleased to present our first report under the renewed Canada-Ontario Labour Market Agreement for Persons with Disabilities signed in March 2014. This agreement provides $76.4 million over four years to support employment for people with disabilities.

In 2015, Ontario used federal funding to support successful provincial employment programs to help remove barriers so that people with disabilities can find training, get jobs and build careers.

Ontario understands that a job is not just a great path to financial security - it is one of the best routes to social inclusion. By investing in better employment outcomes for people with disabilities, we are investing in their independence, health and overall participation in our society.

To that end, Ontario is investing $800,000 to help create a new Centre for Excellence for Employment Services. Operated by the Ontario Disability Employment Network, this new centre will provide support to local community agencies and employers to improve employment services and create new employment opportunities for people with developmental disabilities.

We also understand that the issue is not only about more funding for employment and training programs. Supports and services should be holistic, linked to other needed support systems and easy to access. Related provincial efforts on housing, wages, social assistance, mental health and addictions, and child care align with the goal of promoting improved employment outcomes for Ontarians with disabilities.

We are also supporting youth with disabilities. Launched in September, Ontario’s Youth Job Connection program provides intensive support and training to young people with multiple barriers to employment, including youth with disabilities. Ontario has committed $160 million over two years to help more than 27,000 young people get the skills and training they need to build a better future.

Accessibility continues to be a priority. Our government was the first in the world to move to a modern regulatory regime that mandates accessibility and that requires its staff to be trained on accessibility. Ontario was the first Canadian province with legislation that sets out a clear goal and a timeframe to achieve accessibility in the public, private and non-profit sectors by 2025.

Ontario is committed to building a fair and inclusive society and to securing a high quality of life for persons with disabilities. We look forward to working in partnership with the new federal government on how best to move forward. To ensure our success, we will focus future discussions on improving economic and social outcomes for people with disabilities, reducing program duplication and maximizing our resources.

I look forward to making continued progress in supporting Ontarians with disabilities to reach their personal employment goals and success in the labour market.

The Honourable Dr. Helena Jaczek
Minister of Community and Social Services


Introduction

Under a new 2014 Canada-Ontario Labour Market Agreement for Persons with Disabilities (LMAPD), Canada contributed funding, subject to Ontario cost-matching, for 2014-15 Ontario expenditures on eligible Ontario employment-related programs for people with disabilities. Programs were delivered across the Ministry of Community and Social Services, and the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities.

This annual report highlights the achievements of Ontarians with disabilities under eligible Ontario programs under the Agreement.

Employment is one of the pillars of full inclusion of people with disabilities in the social and economic fabric of Ontario society. We recognize that many people with disabilities can and want to work, but still face barriers that prevent them from realizing their full potential.

Canada-Ontario LMAPD Agreement, 2014

The 2014 Agreement includes the goal of improving employability and employment outcomes for persons with disabilities, with the following objectives:

  • Enhancing the employability of persons with disabilities;
  • Increasing the employment opportunities available to persons with disabilities; and
  • Demonstrating the best possible results to Canadians on investments made under the Agreement as evidenced by enhanced employability and increased labour market participation of persons with disabilities.

Ontario continues to work with persons with disabilities, service providers and employers to identify labour market barriers and employment opportunities for persons with disabilities and the supports they may need to achieve their goals.

To reflect the achievements and experiences of persons with disabilities who have benefitted from the programs funded under the LMAPD, the Ministry will be reporting on a set of employability and employment indicators in the December 2016 report.

Data Sources

Ontario’s program data is derived from Ministry and service provider databases.

Cost-Sharing Under the Agreement

Under the 2014 Canada-Ontario LMAPD, the federal government agreed to share up to 50% of the cost of programs and services that Ontario claims that meet the objectives of the Agreement, up to a maximum federal contribution of $76.4 million.

In 2014-15, Ontario spent approximately $214 million on programs and services funded under the LMAPD, and received the maximum federal contribution of $76.4 million.


Section 1: Ministry of Community and Social Services

Ontario Disability Support Program - Employment Supports

The employment supports component of the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) provides employment assistance to people with disabilities who are interested in preparing for, obtaining, and maintaining competitive employment. ODSP Employment Supports are delivered by a network of approximately 150 service providers across the province that provide a range of services to support competitive employment, such as job coaching, on-the-job training, job placement, and assistive devices and the training to use them.

To be eligible for ODSP Employment Supports, a person must:

  • be 16 years of age or older;
  • be a resident of Ontario (not including tourists, visitors or temporary residents);
  • be legally entitled to work in Canada; and
  • be eligible for ODSP income support OR have a physical or mental disability or impairment that is continuous or recurrent and expected to last one year or more; and the impairment must present a substantial barrier to competitive employment that is verified by a prescribed healthcare professional.

In April 2006, ODSP Employment Supports was transformed from an expenditure-based program into an outcomes-based program. This means service providers receive payment based on their success in placing and retaining clients in jobs. In addition, service providers can provide supports needed by employers to hire and retain clients with disabilities.

Ontario Disability Support Program - Employment Benefits

The income support component of ODSP provides financial assistance to eligible people with disabilities and their families. This includes benefits to help people with disabilities find and maintain employment. Employment-related benefits include:

  • Work-related Benefit (WRB): $100 per month for clients and adult family members who have earnings from employment, a training program, or net positive income from a business, to assist with the incidental costs of work (e.g. transportation);
  • Employment and Training Start-up Benefit (ESUB): $500 in a 12-month period to assist with the cost of starting employment or a training program; and
  • Employment Transition Benefit (ETB): $500 to assist with the transition off of ODSP, available once in a 12-month period.

2014-15 activities1:

  • The number of distinct ODSP clients with a disability who received the WRB was 39,700.
  • The number of ODSP clients with a disability who received the ESUB was 11,800.
  • The number of ODSP clients with a disability who received the ETB was 200.

Ontario Disability Support Program - Monthly Earnings Exemption

The ODSP monthly earnings exemption scheme fully exempts the first $200 of monthly net earnings from employment, a training program or net positive income from the operation of a business. Every dollar of employment earnings above $200 is deducted at 50% (i.e., 50 cents of every dollar of net earnings above $200 is deducted from a client’s monthly income support payment).

As a component of the earnings exemption scheme, the $200 exemption encourages clients to pursue employment by always leaving the client financially better off than if they did not have earnings. In cases where the client’s monthly net earnings are $200 or less, the client does not experience any reduction in their monthly income support payment.

2014-15 activities:

  • The number of distinct ODSP clients with a disability who received a monthly earnings exemption was 37,400.

Developmental Services - Employment Supports

Developmental Services Employment Supports help people with developmental disabilities who need extra assistance to adjust to employment, whether it be physically adapting to a workplace, responding to new stresses and challenges on the job, or simply becoming accustomed to the daily demands of working.

A range of supports are provided including pre-employment training, skills development, job coaching and supported employment.

 2014-15 activities:

  • The Developmental Services Employment Supports program served 4,030 clients with a developmental disability:
    • 588 individuals received support 0-8 hours per day;
    • 36 individuals received support 8-24 hours per day;
    • 1,787 individuals received support at least once a week;
    • 930 individuals received support at least once a month; and
    • 597 individuals received support less that once a month.

In May 2015, Ontario announced $800,000 to help create a new Centre for Excellence for Employment Services. The new centre, which will be run by the Ontario Disability Employment Network, will provide resources to help local community agencies and employers across the province:

  • improve employment services, like on-the-job supports, offered to people with developmental disabilities;
  • build community and employer networks to share best practices and research about employment for people with developmental disabilities;
  • increase awareness about the benefits of hiring people with developmental disabilities; and
  • develop new employment opportunities for people with developmental disabilities across Ontario.

The Centre for Excellence for Employment Services is one of 38 projects receiving funding from the Employment and Modernization Fund. The fund offers financial support to projects that promote greater inclusion and independence for individuals with developmental disabilities, as they have traditionally had less opportunity to participate in the labour market.

1 - The number of clients reported above is a proxy for the 2014-15 fiscal year based on data from April 2014 to October 2014. Note: A portion of these benefits are also claimed under the Canada-Ontario Job Fund Agreement. The values represent the number of persons with a disability who received the benefits. The portion of these benefits paid to family members who were not persons with a disability are cost-shared under the Canada-Ontario Job Fund Agreement.


Section 2: Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities

The Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities assists students as they work towards the successful completion of their post-secondary education, thus enabling them to obtain and maintain meaningful employment.

Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities

Funding is provided to colleges and universities to assist them in meeting their obligations under the Ontario’s Human Rights Code to make their programs and services accessible to students with disabilities. This funding is intended to supplement any expenditures colleges and universities make from their general revenues to meet their legal obligations.

2014-15 activities:

  • Over 59,400 students with disabilities were served by disabilities offices at Ontario colleges and universities. Examples of services provided to students include tutors, note-takers, equipment and technology acquisition, sign language interpreters, and diagnostic services2.

Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities Evaluation

Under the previous LMAPD agreement (2004-2014), the Ministry was required to conduct a program evaluation that included an assessment of employment outcomes and employability skills. This work was undertaken by the Program Standards and Evaluation Unit (PSEU) in 2013 and was completed in 2014.

To ensure the effectiveness of the program the Ministry engaged a working group of college and university representatives to update the Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities allocation model to make it more reflective of cost-drivers and more transparent. The Ministry announced a new allocation model on December 8, 2014.

Ontario will continue to engage regularly with the College Committee on Disability Issues and the Inter-University Disability Issues Association regarding ministry funded programs and issues in service delivery.

2 - Numbers are based on data provided from 2013-14 Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities Reports submitted by institutions to the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities.


Section 3: Program Expenditures

For streamlining purposes, some 2013-14 program expenditures ceased to be claimed under the LMAPD for 2014-15. However, programs no longer claimed in 2014-15 continue to operate.

LMAPD Eligible Program

Final eligible Expenditures
($ Millions)
3 2013-2014

Final eligible Expenditures
($ Millions)
3 2014-154

Ministry of Community and Social Services

 

 

ODSP: Employment Supports

37.2

33.6

ODSP: Employment Benefits (Work-Related Benefit, Employment-Start-Up Benefit and Employment Transition Benefit)5

N/A

42.6

ODSP: Monthly Earning Exemption

0

53.6

Developmental Services - Employment Supports

26.2

32.4

Ontario Works: Addiction Services initiative

 

0

Sub-Total

69.2

162.2

Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care

 

 

Alcohol and Drug Programs6

36.1

0

Community Mental Health Employment Programs:

 

 

Supported Employment

10.4

0

Consumer Operated Alternative Business

3.4

0

Attendant Services

21.5

0

Sub-Total

71.4

0

Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities

 

 

Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities and the Enhanced Services Fund

26.0

32.6

Print-Alternative Materials Fund

1.3

0

George Brown College Support Services for Hearing Impaired, Educational Support Services (Canadian Hearing Society and Interpreter/Intervener Funds)

10.5

0

Learning Opportunities/Disabilities Initiatives

4.0

0

Out-of-Bursary for Deaf Students

1.2

0

Sub-Total

43.0

32.6

Administration Cost @ 15% of the total Provincial Expenditures (@ 10% in 2014-15)

27.6

19.5

Total Expenditures

211.2

214.2

Federal Contribution

76.4

76.4

3 - Figures shown as sub-totals may differ from the sum of listed program expenditures due to rounding.
4 - Figures for 2014-15 are estimates and subject to change.
5 - Note: a portion of these benefits is claimed under the Canada-Ontario Job Fund Agreement. The above expenditure represents only the portion of the benefits that is cost-shared under the LMAPD.
6 - Note: 39.2% of total expenditures are cost-shared.


Appendix A: Figures

Note: The charts below were developed using Statistics Canada`s Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, 2012 (SLID). As announced by the Government of Canada, SLID data is being replaced by data from the Canadian National Household Income Survey.

Earnings for People with Disabilities7

Average earnings are lower among people with disabilities as compared to the rest of the population.

The charts below show the income level breakdown of persons with disabilities who received income as a result of employment in 2012 as compared to people without disabilities in Ontario. A greater percentage of persons with disabilities earn $4,999 or less than persons without disabilities. In addition, a lower percentage of persons with disabilities earn $40,000 or more, than persons without disabilities.

Chart of Distribution of Earnings for Persons with Disabilities in Ontario aged 16-64
Source: Statistics Canada. Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, 2012.

Chart of Distribution of Earnings for persons without Disabilities in Ontario aged 16-64
Source: Statistics Canada. Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, 2012.

Highest Level of Education Attainment8

The chart on page 14 illustrates that a greater percentage of persons with disabilities completed high school and obtained a non-university post-secondary certificate compared to the rest of the population.

Highest Level of Education for Persons with Disabilities and Person without Disabilities in Canada and Ontario aged 16-64
Source: Statistics Canada. Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, 2012.

7 - All data on earnings in this section is for individuals aged 16-64. Earnings refer to any income earned as a result of employment, including self-employment. It does not include income from social assistance, investments, etc.

8 - Note: percentages may not total one hundred as some individuals did not respond to this question.