Table of Contents


A Message from the Honourable Dr. Helena Jaczek, Minister of Community and Social Services

On behalf of the Ontario government, I am pleased to present the second report under the renewed Labour Market Agreement for Persons with Disabilities. This agreement between Canada and Ontario was signed in March 2014, and provides Ontario with $76.4 million annually over four years to support employment for people with disabilities.

This funding is part of the almost $209 million in 2015-16 that Ontario invested to improve employment for people with disabilities.

A key part of my mandate as Minister of Community and Social Services is to promote inclusive communities, build the independence of people with disabilities and improve their quality of life. To accomplish this, my ministry works collaboratively with other ministries, as well as partners and stakeholders in the broader public sector and across the province.

My colleague, The Honourable Tracy MacCharles, Minister Responsible for Accessibility and Minister Responsible for Women’s Issues, was mandated by our Premier Kathleen Wynne to deliver a provincial employment strategy for people with disabilities that builds on the recommendations put forward by the Partnership Council on Employment Opportunities for People with Disabilities. Her office has been working in partnership with my ministry and other partner ministries, including the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development and the Ministry of Economic Development and Growth.

Per our 2016 Budget commitment, this strategy will:

  • Establish a cohesive made-in-Ontario vision with goals, priorities and desired outcomes to give Ontarians with disabilities access to a continuum of employment and training services;
  • Provide a better service experience through streamlined access to employment and training services that recognize the varied needs and employment goals of individuals; and
  • Engage employers as active partners in breaking down employment barriers for people with disabilities, and promoting inclusive workplaces.

This made-in-Ontario employment strategy, will build on work already done, including:

  • Improving social service programs so people can earn more without affecting their financial support, continue to access health benefits and have more opportunities for real employment at real wages;
  • Smoother transitions for young adults with special needs moving from children to adult services;
  • Shifting away from sheltered workshops; and
  • Projects across the developmental services sector that develop job skills and employment, and promote service innovation and modernization.

We are committed to continuing to transform Ontario’s employment and training system to improve access to, and provide job seekers and employers with, proven, coordinated and targeted services.

Growing the economy and improving employment opportunities and outcomes for people with disabilities is critical to supporting the economic and social inclusion of all Ontarians, and contributes to the strength of our communities.

Looking ahead, the next couple of years promise continued progress and change. Together, with individuals and families, the federal government, and the public, private and not-for-profit sectors, we are building a better future for all people in Ontario.

The Honourable Dr. Helena Jaczek

Minister of Community and Social Services


Introduction

Under the Canada-Ontario Labour Market Agreement for Persons with Disabilities (LMAPD), which expires in March 2018, the federal government contributes up to 50% of the cost of Ontario’s programs and services that meet the LMAPD objectives, up to a maximum federal contribution of $76.4 million.

The LMAPD objectives are:

  • Enhancing the employability of people with disabilities;
  • Increasing the employment opportunities available to people with disabilities; and
  • Demonstrating the best possible results to Canadians on investments made under the LMAPD as evidenced by enhanced employability and increased labour market participation of people with disabilities.

Ontario offers a broad suite of programs and services to respond to the diverse experiences and aspirations of people with disabilities to prepare for, find and maintain employment. The LMAPD programs and expenditures represent only a small fraction of Ontario’s investments in employment supports for people with disabilities. The LMAPD funded programs are:

  • The Ministry of Community and Social Service’s developmental services employment supports;
  • The Ministry of Community and Social Services’ Ontario Disability Support Program Employment Supports, and employment benefits and the monthly earnings exemption under the income support component of the Ontario Disability Support Program; and,
  • The Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development’s Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities (AFSD).

These programs target resources towards supporting the efforts of individuals with disabilities facing complex barriers such as entering or returning to the labour market after long-term unemployment, or supporting the efforts of youth with disabilities to access the opportunities available in post-secondary education.

Our Results

Consistent with the provisions of the 2014 LMAPD, Ontario is reporting on a new set of indicators in this year’s Annual Report. This data is derived from Ministry and service provider databases and from participant surveys.

The performance indicators help to describe individuals reached by programs funded under the Agreement and reflect the achievements and experiences of persons with disabilities who have benefited from these programs.

Some key findings include:

  • LMAPD funded programs demonstrated high client satisfaction rates among survey respondents (ranging from 73% to 95%).
  • For survey respondents receiving developmental services employment supports, over half found a job within six months of receiving supports. A large majority (94%) of employed survey respondents agreed that the supports they received helped them get their job.
  • For survey respondents receiving ODSP employment supports, 63% felt that the supports they received prepared them to work in a new or better job. For survey respondents receiving ODSP employment benefits and /or the monthly earnings exemption, 50% indicated that receiving these supports prepared them for new or better employment.
  • Most survey respondents receiving ODSP employment supports, ODSP employment benefits and or the monthly earnings exemption reported that their employment relates to their skills and interests rather than their education.
  • For AFSD, 73% of college students who self-identified as having a disability, and indicated they registered with their Office for Students with Disabilities, were employed six months after graduation. 69% were working full-time hours (30 hours or more per week).

More information regarding LMAPD performance indicators can be found in the appendix of this report.

Supporting the Inclusion of all Ontarians

Ontario has already built a strong foundation for success through the Province’s Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 (AODA ). The release of The Path to 2025: Ontario’s Accessibility Action Plan  reaffirmed the government’s commitment . Five accessibility standards are law under the AODA in the areas of customer service, information and communications, employment, transportation and the design of public spaces which impact everyday life. For example, as of January 1, 2016, Ontario’s Accessible Employment Standard required businesses with 50 or more employees to make employment practices accessible to meet the needs of employees and job applicants with disabilities.

Work towards achieving an accessible Ontario by 2025 will continue with the establishment of a Standards Development Committee to begin work on a Health Care Standard under the AODA.

Ontario is continuing with its comprehensive reform of social assistance in the context of the broader income security system with the goals of: reducing poverty, supporting efforts for individuals to participate in the economy, and providing human services in a way that makes sense to the people who need them.

Working Together

Ontario is encouraged by recent federal announcements to develop a federal poverty reduction strategy and accessibility legislation that align with and build on, provincial and territorial investments. We are pleased to see that work has begun to engage Canadians in both of these areas. We look forward to working with the federal government on shaping the future of federal investments where they can best support access to good quality job opportunities for all Ontarians with disabilities.

In June 2016, federal, provincial and territorial Labour Market Ministers reinforced their commitment to collaborate on key opportunities and challenges facing the Canadian workforce and agreed to work together to conduct broad-based consultations on labour market transfer agreements.

To support this process, Ontario held roundtable discussions with individuals with disabilities, community groups, service providers, labour, employers, public colleges, and municipalities, to hear about their experiences with current programs and services.

On October 14th, Labour Market Ministers endorsed the public release of a consultation summary report that will inform the collaborative approach to ensure the next generation of agreements:

  • Are client-focused, flexible and responsive to the needs of individuals, workers, employers and under-represented groups including Indigenous Peoples and people with disabilities;
  • Build on strong evidence for relevant performance measurement to better inform and serve Canadians and help them achieve meaningful employment outcomes; and,
  • Foster innovative approaches and the sharing of best practices.

Ontario’s goal is to continue to work with the federal government, Ontarians with disabilities, employers and all partners to determine ways to improve employment supports in a way that makes sense for people with disabilities and removes barriers to employment. Most importantly, we will also make sure to hear from those with lived experience, to:

  • Improve access to the right supports and services at the right time for success in finding and keeping good jobs (e.g., health supports, accessible and affordable transportation);
  • Build the capacity of employers to hire and accommodate people with disabilities in the workplace; and to
  • Collect the data needed to assess the impact of employment programs across the continuum of people’s needs and objectives.
In realizing the social and economic participation of all Ontarians, we welcome the federal government's collaboration in charting a joint path towards a comprehensive and common approach on opportunities that support employment and training needs for people with disabilities.

Section 1: Ministry of Community and Social Services

The general policy intent of Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) interventions is to help people with disabilities to successfully pursue their employment goals. Together, the interventions provide a range of supports for individuals at different points along the employment continuum.

Ontario Disability Support Program - Employment Supports

The employment supports component of ODSP provides employment assistance to people with disabilities who are interested in preparing for, obtaining, and maintaining competitive employment. ODSP employment supports is delivered by a network of approximately 150 service providers across the province that provide a range of services to support competitive employment, such as  job coaching, on-the-job training, job placement, and assistive devices and the training to use them.

Ontario Disability Support Program - Employment Benefits

The income support component of ODSP provides financial assistance to eligible people with disabilities and their families. This includes benefits to help people with disabilities find and maintain employment. Employment-related benefits include:

  • Work-related Benefit (WRB): $100 per month for adults who have earnings from employment, a training program, or net positive income from a business, to assist with the incidental costs of work (e.g. transportation).
  • Employment and Training Start-up Benefit (ESUB): funding up to $500 in a 12-month period can be provided to assist with the cost of starting employment, a training program, or an approved activity that will assist the person to become and stay employed. Eligible expenses include, but are not limited to:
    • work wear, uniforms;
    • tools and equipment;
    • grooming costs;
    • transportation;
    • licensing fees and association costs;
    • application fee for General Education Development test.
  • Employment Transition Benefit (ETB): A person who exits ODSP because he/she is no longer financially eligible for income support due to their earnings is eligible for a lump-sum $500 payment upon exit. The intent of the benefit is to mitigate the loss of the monthly $100 work-related benefit and to help with work-related costs in the initial months after leaving ODSP.

Ontario Disability Support Program - Monthly Earnings Exemption

The $200 earnings exemption is designed to encourage people to find and maintain employment. As an income exemption, it reduces the amount of monthly net earnings deducted from the monthly income support payment, thereby increasing the level of overall monthly income.

The ODSP monthly earnings exemption scheme fully exempts the first $200 of monthly net earnings from employment, a training program or net positive income from the operation of a business. Every dollar of net earnings above $200 is deducted at 50% (i.e., 50 cents of each dollar).

In respect of this intervention and as reflected in Ontario’s performance indicators:

  • The $200 earnings exemption is not time-limited;
  • A client may have started receiving the earnings exemption in the previous year(s), depending on when they started working ( for this reason for indicators 2, 3, 7 and 8 Ontario reported on clients who received the intervention at any point during the reporting year (2015-16) rather than at the point of pre-intervention);
  • A person’s earnings may be periodic throughout the reporting year, and therefore, so would the intervention.

Developmental Services - Employment Supports

Developmental services employment supports help people with developmental disabilities that need extra assistance to adjust to employment, whether it be physically adapting to a workplace, responding to new stresses and challenges on the job, or simply becoming accustomed to the daily demands of working.

A range of supports are provided including pre-employment training, skills development, job coaching and supported employment.

In the fall of 2015, Ontario committed to shift away from sheltered workshops and move towards inclusive, competitive employment in the community. Agencies are being supported to engage families and persons currently receiving services in sheltered workshops as they move toward assisting people in finding competitive employment or other meaningful community participation. This process will be different across Ontario, for each agency and for each person.

In September 2016, Ontario announced the second call for proposals under the Employment and Modernization Fund. Projects will start in 2017/18 and end by 2018/19.

The fund promotes sector innovation and collaboration to make services and supports more person-centred and responsive. Preference is given to projects with transformative potential that have a long-term impact beyond the end of the fund.

The objectives of this fund are to:

  • Advance the developmental services transformation through initiatives promoting person-centred approaches to support individuals in inclusive, community-based settings;
  • Build community capacity by developing better linkages with existing services, resources, and infrastructure in local communities;
  • Encourage collaboration within the sector, and develop partnerships with other sectors;
  • Promote efficiency and flexibility through responsive service delivery models and organizational structures;
  • Promote better performance measurement and accountability to ensure activities and supports are directly linked to individual outcomes; and
  • Encourage the replication of best practices and innovative approaches through knowledge sharing across the sector.

Section 2: Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development

The Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities provides funding to assist publicly-funded postsecondary institutions to meet their legal obligations to people with disabilities.

Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities

The Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities assists colleges and universities with costs related to the operation of offices for students with disabilities. This includes a wide range of services and accommodations such as transitions programming, arranging note-taking support for students with visual impairments, providing access to computers and appropriate technological learning aids and working with faculty to arrange extra time to write tests and exams for students with disabilities.


Section 3: Program Expenditures

LMAPD Eligible Program

Final eligible Expenditures
($ Millions)
1
2014-2015
Final eligible Expenditures
($ Millions)1
2015-16
Ministry of Community and Social Services    
ODSP: Employment Supports 33.6 35.5
ODSP: Employment benefits (Work-Related Benefit, Employment-Start-Up Benefit and Employment Transition Benefit) 2 41.2 40.0
ODSP: Monthly Earning Exemption 53.9 54.0
Developmental Services – Employment Supports 32.4 27.7
Sub-Total 161.1 157.2
Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities    
Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities and the Enhanced Services Fund 32.6 32.5
Sub-Total 32.6 32.5
Administration Cost @ 10% of the total Provincial Expenditures 19.4 19.0
Total Expenditures 213.1 208.7
Federal Contribution 76.4 76.4

1 - Figures shown as sub-totals may differ from the sum of listed program expenditures due to rounding.
2 - Note: a portion of these benefits is claimed under the Canada-Ontario Job Fund Agreement. The above expenditure represents only the portion of the benefits that is cost-shared under the LMAPD.


Appendix: Performance Indicators

Consistent with the provisions of the 2014 LMAPD, Ontario is reporting on a new set of performance indicators in this year’s Annual Report.

Ontario’s Disability Support Program (employment supports, employment benefits, and monthly earnings exemption)

Methodology

Program data sources include MCSS’ Employment Supports Management System and the Social Assistance Management System, where the data was available. The remaining data was collected through a survey that was given to a sample of people receiving ODSP who used employment-related benefits and services offset with LMAPD funding.

To administer the survey, a random sample of individuals who received services funded under the LMAPD was identified from the entire population of people receiving ODSP income and employment supports . For the purposes of surveying , the employment benefits and earnings exemption were treated as a single intervention.

The survey was divided into two sections. The first section of the survey covered income supports (employment benefits and the monthly earnings exemption) and was administered to all individuals. The second section covered employment supports and was administered only to people who also received employment supports in addition to income supports.

A total of 5,936 individuals were called, all of whom were intended to complete the survey section on employment benefits and the monthly earnings exemption. 863 respondents completed this section, resulting in a response rate of 14.5%. This exceeds the minimum sample of 384 respondents recommended in the “Performance Indicators for the New Generation of LMAPDs,” which was drafted by the federal, provincial and territorial governments in August 2015. However, despite best efforts, only 364 respondents completed the employment supports section, resulting in a 15% response rate. This number falls slightly below the minimum sample recommended.  As all the questions were voluntary, the total number of respondents per question varies.

Program: ODSP Employment Supports

Indicator 1: Number of individuals served by intervention type in 2015/16.

Description Number of Individuals Served
Individuals placed in employment or started a business and received ongoing services and supports to retain3 employment or a business this fiscal year 2,137
Individuals placed in employment or started a business inthe previous fiscal year and received ongoing retention services and supports in this fiscal year 3,428
Employed Individuals who were provided retention services and supports to manage a job crisis in this fiscal year 414
Employed Individuals who were provided services and supports to pursue job advancement in this fiscal year 130

3 - Although the 13 week job placement requirement and 33 month retention period amounts to three years, the length of time an individual is typically in the program is longer. The duration is determined by the length of time an individual requires to reach the job placement criteria i.e., 13 weeks of cumulative work.

Indicator 2: For those unemployed pre-intervention, number of Individuals by pre-intervention education, gender, age

Response: Number of individuals placed/started a business and provided ongoing employment retention supports4

  Clients placed/started a business in this fiscal year Clients placed/started a business in previous fiscal year  
Education Level    
Completed university 23 5
Some university 20 3
Completed college 398 679
Some college 48 21
Completed apprenticeship 2 0
Completed high-school 735 1,234
Some high-school 452 782
Less than high-school 72 123
Unknown 85 79
Gender    
Male 1,209 1,961
Female 842 1,331
Not provided 86 136
Age    
15-29 853 1,358
30-54 1,065 2,069
55-64 198 445
65 or older 12 56
Not provided 26 45
Average monthly hours and earnings    
Avg. monthly hours 58 57
Avg. monthly earnings $633 $614

4 - Ibid

Indicator 3: For those employed pre-intervention, number of individuals by pre-intervention hours worked, hourly earnings, education, gender, age

Response Number of Individuals
Education Level  
Completed university 10
Some university 4
Completed college 99
Some college 10
Completed apprenticeship 0
Completed high-school 202
Some high-school 87
Less than high-school 11
Unknown 30
Gender  
Male 277
Female 254
Not provided 15
Age  
15-29 122
30-54 293
55-64 99
65 or older 27
Not provided 5
Average monthly hours and earnings  
Avg. monthly hours worked 69
Avg. monthly earnings $661

Indicator 4: Proportion who earn credentials/certification as a result of intervention, by intervention type5

Response Percentage Count
Yes, please tell us what: _______ 6 18% 65
No 74% 268
I don’t know 8% 27
  Total Responses 360

5 - Earning a credential/certification is not a key objective of ODSP employment supports and therefore not a meaningful measure of this program.
6 - Among the respondents who answered yes, the following certifications and credentials were the most commonly reported: first aid/CPR; food handling; fork lift license; WHIMIS; security guard license.

Indicator 5: Proportion who indicate career advancement (e.g., promotion, increased responsibilities, better wages) as a result of intervention, by intervention type

Client Description Number of clients7
Employed clients who were provided services and supports to pursue job advancement in this fiscal year 130

7 - Ontario reported on the “number of clients” for 2015-16 for this indicator and will report on the “proportion of clients” in future years.

Indicator 6: Proportion who indicate they are prepared for new or better employment as a result of intervention, by intervention type

Response Percentage Count
Strongly agree 25% 87
Agree 39% 140
Neither agree nor disagree 11% 40
Disagree 12% 42
Strongly disagree 4% 15
Doesn’t apply 9% 32
  Total Responses 3568

8 - Note: 2,361 clientsindividuals were intended to complete the survey on ODSP Employment Supportsemployment supports. Despite best efforts, the number of completed responses falls slightly below the sample size (384) recommended in the LMAPD Performance Indicators Discussion Paper (August 2015).

Indicator 7: For those unemployed pre-intervention, proportion9 of individuals by employment status at 3 and 12 months post-intervention (employed/unemployed, hours worked, hourly earnings), by intervention

Description 3 month follow-up
# of clients employed10
3 month follow-up
Avg. monthly hours
3 month follow-up
Avg. monthly earnings
12 month follow-up
# of clients employed
12 month follow-up
Avg. monthly hours
12 month follow-up
Avg. monthly earnings
Individuals placed in employment or started a business and received ongoing services and supports to retain11 employment or a business this fiscal year 914 68 $737 N/A12 N/A N/A
Individuals placed in employment or started a business previous fiscal year and received ongoing services and supports to retain  employment or a business this fiscal year 3,664 62 $663 2,291 65 $675

10 - Ontario reported on the “number of clients” for 2015-16 for this indicator and will report on the “proportion of clients” in future years.

11 - Although the 13 week job placement requirement and 33 month retention period amounts to three years, the length of time an individual is typically in the program is longer . The duration is determined by the length of time an individual requires to reach the job placement criteria i.e., 13 weeks of cumulative work.

12 - The criterion for “placed in employment” is 13 cumulative weeks of employment; therefore, with respect to clients placed in employment in this fiscal year, the point of the 12 month follow up will fall within the next fiscal year

Indicator 8: For those employed pre-intervention, proportion of individuals by employment status at 3 and 12 months post-intervention (employed/unemployed, hours worked, hourly earnings), by intervention type

Client Description 3 month follow-up
# of clients employed13
3 month follow-up
Avg. monthly hours
3 month follow-up
Avg. monthly earnings
12 month follow-up
# of clients employed
12 month follow-up
Avg. monthly hours
12 month follow-up
Avg. monthly earnings
Individuals who were provided services and supports to retain employment/a business or to pursue career advancement 428 78 699 278 74 $700

Indicator 9: Proportion of individuals indicating employment is closely related to educational background/work undertaken during intervention14

Response Percentage Count
Your education 20% 73
Your interests 61% 221
Your skills 69% 250
Any training you may have received 40% 147
Any previous work you may have done in the past 51% 186

Indicator 10: Proportion of individuals satisfied with intervention, by intervention type

Response Percentage Count
Very satisfied 34% 123
Satisfied 43% 153
Dissatisfied 8% 30
Very dissatisfied 5% 18
I don’t know 10% 37
  Total Responses 36115

13 - Ontario reported on the “number of clients” for 2015-16 for this indicator and will report on the “proportion of clients” in future years.

14 - Respondents were able to select multiple options, therefore the totals add up to more than 100%.

15 - Note: 2,361 individuals were intended to complete the survey on ODSP employment supports.  Despite best efforts, the number of completed responses falls slightly below the sample size (384) recommended in the LMAPD Performance Indicators Discussion Paper (August 2015).

Additional Indicator(s):

Proportion of individuals who indicate that receiving ODSP employment supports helped them get their job?

Response Percentage Count
Strongly agree 31% 111
Agree 38% 136
Neither agree nor disagree 7% 24
Disagree 9% 33
Strongly disagree 5% 17
Doesn’t apply 10% 34
  Total Responses 35516

16 - Note: 2,361 individuals were intended to complete the survey on ODSP employment supports.  Despite best efforts, the number of completed responses falls slightly below the sample size (384) recommended in the LMAPD Performance Indicators Discussion Paper (August 2015).

Proportion of individuals who indicated that receiving ODSP employment supports helped them keep their job

Response Percentage Count
Strongly agree 22% 80
Agree 33% 117
Neither agree nor disagree 9% 32
Disagree 17% 62
Strongly disagree 6% 21
Doesn’t apply 13% 45
  Total Responses 35717

17 - ibid

Program(s):

  • ODSP employment benefits, including the work related benefit (WRB), employment training start-up benefit (ESUB) and employment transition benefit (ETB); and
  • ODSP monthly earnings exemption

Unlike time-limited interventions (e.g., pre-employment training or apprenticeship programs), the ODSP employment benefits and the monthly earnings exemption are ongoing or periodic interventions that, together, provide supports for people with disabilities at different points along the employability continuum.

For this reason, Ontario is reporting on people who received an intervention during the reporting year rather than at point of pre-intervention , as in many cases, the point of pre-intervention may not fall within the reporting year (e.g., the person may have been working and receiving the earnings exemption and the work-related benefit for the past two years). 

For the purposes of surveying , the employment benefits and earnings exemption were treated as a single intervention.  Many people receive more than one of these benefits and, in order to simplify the survey , questions related to employment benefits and earnings exemption were categorized as income supports.

Indicator 1: Number of individuals served by intervention type in 2015/16

Program Number of individuals served Total
WRB 44,994  
ESUB 17,951  
ETB 18  
ODSP Employment Benefits (total)   62,963
ODSP Monthly Earnings Exemption 43,181 43,181

Indicator 2 (alternative indicator): Number of distinct individuals with a disability who received the intervention at least once during the fiscal year by education, gender and age.

Response Number of Individuals
WRB
Number of Individuals
ESUB
Number of Individuals
ETB
Number of Individuals
EE
Education Level        
Less than high school 4,969 1,116 0 4,697
High school 28,719 12,042 8 27,784
Post-secondary 11,131 4,725 10 10,545
Unknown 175 68 0 155
Gender        
Male 24,429 9,328 10 23,849
Female 20,565 8,623 8 19,332
Age        
15-29 11,462 4,630 2 12,402
30-54 26,198 11,163 14 24,603
55-64 7,135 2,114 2 6,028
65 or older 199 44 0 148
Average monthly earnings        
Less than $100 13,178 13,599 6 6,978
$100.01 - $200 4,984 739 0 5,556
$200.01 - $300 3,509 517 0 4,134
$300.01 - $400 2,687 407 0 3,150
$400.01 - $500 2,360 323 0 2,731
$500.01 and over 18,276 2,366 12 20,632

Indicator 3: For those employed pre-intervention, number of individuals by pre-intervention hours worked, hourly earnings, education, gender, age

Please see indicator #2.

Indicator 4: Proportion who earn credentials/certification as a result of intervention, by intervention type18

Response Percentage Count
Yes, please tell us what: _______19 11% 89
No 82% 697
I don't know 7% 60
  Total Responses 846

18 - Earning a credential/certification is not a key objective of ODSP Employment Benefits or the ODSP Monthly Earnings Exemption and therefore not a meaningful measure of these programs.

19 - Among those who answered yes, a number of respondents indicated that the intervention had helped them earn a college diploma or certificate. Other common responses included Food Handling Certificate, Security Guard Certificate, high school diploma/GED, and university degree.

Indicator 5: Proportion who indicate career advancement (e.g., promotion, increased responsibilities, better wages) as a result of intervention, by intervention type20

`
Response Percentage Count
Strongly agree 4% 38
Agree 16% 137
Neither agree nor disagree 11% 89
Disagree 26% 221
Strongly disagree 6% 48
Doesn’t apply 37% 310
  Total Responses 843

20 - Career advancement is not a key objective of ODSP employment benefits or the ODSP monthly earning exemption and therefore not a meaningful measure of these programs.

Indicator 6: Proportion who indicate they are prepared for new or better employment as a result of intervention, by intervention type21

Response Percentage Count
Strongly agree 13% 109
Agree 37% 313
Neither agree nor disagree 13% 113
Disagree 13% 112
Strongly disagree 4% 34
Doesn’t apply 19% 163
  Total Responses 844

21 - Preparation for new/better employment is not a key objective of ODSP employment benefits or the ODSP monthly earnings exemption and therefore not a meaningful measure of these programs.

Indicator 7: For those unemployed pre-intervention, proportion of individuals by employment status at 3 and 12 months post-intervention (employed/unemployed, hours worked, hourly earnings), by intervention

For ODSP employment benefits, Ontario is reporting on the employment status of people who received ESUB only. To receive WRB and ETB, individuals must be employed and Ontario cannot track ETB clients once they have exited the social assistance system for employment. Therefore, this indicator applies only to people who received ESUB and who may or may not have earnings in the month they receive ESUB.

Description # of clients % of total Avg. monthly earnings
Individuals who received ESUB for the first time in 2015-16 and had earnings 3 months later 6,590 37% 739
Individuals who received ESUB for the first time 2015-16 and were  not on ODSP 3 months later 569 3% n/a

As noted above, the ODSP monthly earnings exemption is not time-limited. A person may receive the exemption on an ongoing or periodic basis.  As a person is eligible for the earnings exemption every month that they report earnings, Ontario is reporting on the alternative indicator below.

Alternative Indicator: Average monthly earnings of individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption per month within the fiscal year

Employment Status – Earnings Exemption Number of individuals Avg. monthly earnings of clients
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 12 months of the year 14,046 547
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 11 months of the year 3,555 706
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 10 months of the year 2,677 803
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 9 months of the year 2,033 809
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 8 months of the year 1,915 710
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 7 months of the year 1,777 747
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 6 months of the year 2,094 714
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 5 months of the year 2,311 709
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 4 months of the year 2,424 695
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 3 months of the year 2,854 629
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 2 months of the year 3,218 582
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 1 months of the year 4,277 508

Indicator 8: For those employed pre-intervention, proportion of individuals by employment status at 3 and 12 months post-intervention (employed/ unemployed, hours worked, hourly earnings), by intervention type

See indicator #7.22

22 - Given the long-term nature of ODSP employment benefits and the ODSP monthly earnings exemption Ontario did not collect data pre-intervention. See indicator #7 for results showing employment status.

Indicator 9: Proportion of individuals indicating employment is closely related to educational background/work undertaken during intervention23

Response Percentage Count
Your education 20% 168
Your interests 60% 493
Your skills 67% 552
Any training you may have received 36% 297
Any previous work you may have done in the past 51% 424

23 - Respondents were able to select multiple options, therefore the totals add up to more than 100%.

Indicator 10: Proportion of individuals satisfied with intervention, by intervention type

Response Percentage Count
Very satisfied

22%

187

Satisfied 51% 433
Dissatisfied 12% 99
Very dissatisfied 5% 43
I don’t know 10% 87
  Total Responses 849

Additional Indicator(s): Over half of survey respondents reported that getting the benefit(s) and/or earnings exemption made keeping a job easier. 

As a key objective of ODSP employment benefits and ODSP monthly earnings exemption is to encourage Ontarians to maintain employment, Ontario reported on the proportion of people who felt that the intervention made keeping their job easier.

Getting the benefit(s) and/or earnings exemption made keeping a job easier. Do you:

Response Percentage Count
Strongly agree 20% 171
Agree 43% 368
Neither agree nor disagree 10% 82
disagree 12% 99
Strongly disagree 4% 38
doesn't apply 11% 89
  Total Responses 847

Program: Developmental Services Employment Supports

Methodology

Administrative data was used to report on Indicator 1 (number of people served). In order to supplement this data for indicators, a province-wide survey was administered to a sample of people accessing developmental services Employment Supports in order to report on the remaining indicators. 

A total of 725 respondents completed the survey. This exceeds the minimum sample of 384 respondents required in the LMAPD Indicators Discussion Paper, and makes up 18% of the total population served under developmental services Employment Supports in 2014/15.  As all the questions were voluntary, the total number of respondents per question varies and is reported in each table. However, for each indicator reported on, the minimum sample size recommended was exceeded.

Indicator 1: Number of individuals served by intervention type in 2015/16.

4,030 individuals were served by the developmental services employment Supports program in 2015/16.

Indicator 2: For those unemployed pre-intervention, number of individuals by pre-intervention education, gender, age

Reporting on gender will be included in next year’s LMAPD Annual Report. As agreed to by the federal government, Ontario is not reporting on education level as this is not a meaningful measure of the program’s objectives.

Age Number of survey respondents
17 years of age or younger 6
18-24 128
25-34 221
35-44 129
45-54 141
55 years of age or older 92
Preferred not to answer 5

Indicator 3: For those employed pre-intervention, number of individuals by pre-intervention hours worked, hourly earnings, education, gender, age

Not Applicable. Ontario does not collect data on this indicator as individuals already competitively employed would typically not be prioritized to receive developmental services employment supports.  As a result, there would be very few, if any, clients employed prior to participating in the program.

Indicator 4: Proportion who earn credentials/certification as a result of intervention, by intervention type

Not Applicable. Ontario does not collect data on this indicator for developmental services employment supports as earning a credential/certification is not a key objective of this program and therefore not a meaningful measure of this program.

Indicator 5: Proportion who indicate career advancement (e.g., promotion, increased responsibilities, better wages) as a result of intervention, by intervention type

Not Applicable. Ontario does not collect data on this indicator as career advancement is not a key objective of the developmental services and employment supports program and therefore not a meaningful measure of this program.

Indicator 6: Proportion who indicate they are prepared for new or better employment as a result of intervention, by intervention type

Response Proportion who indicated that receiving developmental services employment supports made it easier for them to find a new job
Yes 78%
No 5%
I don’t know 17%

Indicator 7: For those unemployed pre-intervention, proportion of individuals by employment status at 3 and 12 months post-intervention (employed/unemployed, hours worked, hourly earnings), by intervention

 

Response
Proportion of survey respondents
Found a paying job within 6 months24 after receiving developmental services employment supports  
Yes 63%25
No 37%
Hours worked per week  
Less than 10 45%
Between 10 and 20 38%
More than 20 18%

Money earned per hour

 
$11.25 per hour to $14 per hour 80%
$14 per hour to $18 per hour 5%
Other 15%

24 - Ontario reported follow up with clients at 6 months as opposed to 3 and 12 months. A three month follow up will be too early to report back on client progress.

25 - 60% of survey respondents applied for a job after receiving developmental services employment supports. The results suggest that those who apply for work after receiving employment supports are likely to become employed.

Indicator 8: For those employed pre-intervention, proportion of individuals by employment status at 3 and 12 months post-intervention (employed/unemployed, hours worked, hourly earnings), by intervention type

Not Applicable. Ontario does not collect data on this indicator as individuals already competitively employed would typically not be prioritized to receive developmental services employment supports. As a result, there would be very few, if any, clients employed prior to participating in the program.

Indicator 9: Proportion of individuals indicating employment is closely related to educational background/work undertaken during intervention

Response Proportion of survey respondents
Very related 41%
Somewhat related 39%
Somewhat unrelated 6%
Very unrelated 2%
I don’t know 13%

Indicator 10: Proportion of individuals satisfied with intervention, by intervention type

Response Proportion of survey respondents
Very satisfied 48%
Satisfied 47%
Dissatisfied 0.8%
Very dissatisfied 0.4%
I don’t know 4%

Additional Indicator(s):

Proportion who indicate that receiving developmental services employment supports helped them get their job

Response Proportion of survey respondents
Yes 94%
No 0.4%
I don’t know 5%

Proportion who indicate that their job is related to their interests, education, skills, and/or their previous work

Response Proportion of survey respondents
Your interests 65%
Your education 16%
Your skills 75%
Your previous work 35%
None of the above 3%
I don’t know 5%

Program: Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities

Indicators 1 and 2 were collected from the institutions as part of their annual Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities report to the ministry.

For Indicators 8 and 9, data pertaining to colleges is from the 2015-16 Graduate Outcomes Survey. The Graduate Outcomes Survey is a telephone survey conducted by a third party service provider six months after graduation.  An attempt is made to contact every graduate, even if they are residing out of the province. The Survey asks graduates about their activities after graduation. Completing these surveys is voluntary.  97,639 college graduates were eligible to be surveyed with a response rate of 47.4%. Employment results from the 2015 Ontario University Graduate Survey will be available in January 2017.

For Indicator 10, data pertaining to colleges comes from the 2015-16 Student Satisfaction Survey. The Student Satisfaction Survey is conducted during classroom time, with students filling out an anonymous paper survey. The survey asks students to indicate their satisfaction with the overall quality of their learning experience. Completing the survey is voluntary. There were 128,654 respondents this year.

Indicator 1: Number of individuals served by intervention type in 2015/16.

Individuals Number of Individuals Served
University students 31,993
College students 34,815
Total 66,808

Indicator 2 (alternative indicator): Number of individuals by education, gender, age (regardless of pre-employment status)26

Response Number of individuals served
Gender University Students College Students
Male 10,936 14,190
Female 14,902 20,116
Other 28 12
Undisclosed 6,102 497
Age    
Less than 20 8,519 11,979
21-30 14,683 15,835
31-40 1,854 3,447
41-50 725 1,730
51-60 290 765
61 and above 93 92
Undisclosed 5,829 967

26 - As agreed to by the governments of Canada and Ontario, Ontario will report on education status of individuals in December 2017. Phase-in in time is required to collect this information.

Indicator 3: For those employed pre-intervention, number of individuals by pre-intervention hours worked, hourly earnings, education, gender, age

Not Applicable. Ontario does not collect data on this indicator as the Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities is designed to support academic attainment, not immediate employment outcomes.

Indicator 4: Proportion who earn credentials/certification as a result of intervention, by intervention type

As agreed to by the governments of Ontario and Canada, Ontario will report on this indicator in December 2017.27

27 - Phase-in time is required to amend existing college and university surveys and to collect data.

Indicator 5: Proportion who indicate career advancement (e.g., promotion, increased responsibilities, better wages) as a result of intervention, by intervention type

Not Applicable. Ontario does not collect data on this indicator as the Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities is designed to support academic attainment, not immediate employment outcomes.

Indicator 6: Proportion who indicate they are prepared for new or better employment as a result of intervention, by intervention type

Not Applicable. Ontario does not collect data on this indicator as the Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities is designed to support academic attainment, not immediate employment outcomes.

Indicator 7: For those unemployed pre-intervention, proportion of individuals by employment status at 3 and 12 months post-intervention (employed/unemployed, hours worked, hourly earnings), by intervention

Not Applicable. Ontario does not collect data on this indicator as the Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities is designed to support academic attainment, not immediate employment outcomes.

Indicator 8 (alternative indicator): Proportion of individuals by employment status at 6 months and 24 months after graduation (employed/unemployed, full-time/part-time, and salary)

Response College Students - 6 months after graduation28
Employment Rate  
Percentage employed 73%
Was your employment for 30 hours a week or more?  
Yes 69%
No 37%
Average Annual Salary  
Mean $27,191

Indicator 9: Proportion of individuals indicating employment is closely related to educational background/work undertaken during intervention

Response Collegfe Students - Percentage
Yes 49.2%29
No 50.8%

Indicator 10: Proportion of individuals satisfied with intervention, by intervention type

Description College Students - Proportion of individuals satisfied with the Office of Students with Disabilities30
Usage Satisfaction Rate
High use individuals31 84%
Low use individuals 61%

28 - This data reports on college students who self-identified as having a disability and indicated they registered with their Office for Students with Disabilities. It should be compared with caution to other indicators. Reporting on colleges at 24 months is not yet available. Data for university students will be provided once it becomes available.

29 - Data for university students will be provided once it becomes available.

30 - This indicator only reports on respondents to the Student Satisfaction Survey who indicated they had used services from their Office for Students with Disabilities. Note: data applies to college students only. Information is not currently collected for university students or graduates.  Data for university students will be provided in December 2018.

31 - Respondents to the Student Satisfaction Survey were asked to indicate their usage of college services. Respondents who indicated high or low usage are provided above.