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Table of Contents


A Message from the Honourable Dr. Helena Jaczek, Minister of Community and Social Services

On behalf of the Ontario government, I am pleased to present the 2016-17 Annual Report of Ontario’s work under the Labour Market Agreement for Persons with Disabilities. This agreement between Canada and Ontario was originally signed in March 2014. As part of this agreement, the federal government agrees to cost share 50% of eligible expenditures for Ontario programs and services for people with disabilities, up to a maximum federal contribution of $76.4 million. Ontario has consistently gone above and beyond and spent more on these programs than the maximum federal contribution. In 2016-17, Ontario invested $215 million under the Agreement, including the federal contribution of $76.4 million, to improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities. This is higher than the $209 million spent in 2015-16.

Ontario welcomed the federal government’s 2017 budget announcement of $1.8 billion over six years, starting in 2017-18, to expand the Labour Market Development Agreements (LMDAs), an additional $900 million over six years, beginning in 2017-18, to consolidate the existing Canada Job Fund Agreement, the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities and the Targeted Initiative for Older Workers into a new Workforce Development Agreement (WDA). In addition, the proposed amendments to the Employment Insurance (EI) Act to broaden worker eligibility for programs and services under the LMDAs will benefit more Ontarians, especially underrepresented groups, to access EI-funded skills training and employment supports.

My ministry and the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development are working very closely with the federal government to ensure that the new WDA supports the inclusion and employment aspirations of all Ontarians with disabilities. Moving forward, Ontario will be reporting on employment programming for persons with disabilities under the new WDA.

A key part of my mandate as Minister of Community and Social Services is to support low-income Ontarians to reach their full potential and to promote inclusion and improve supports for persons with disabilities. As part of our focus on income security, including for people with disabilities, my ministry launched a Basic Income Pilot in Summer 2017 to provide a different approach to income security and reducing poverty that can better support vulnerable workers, improve health and education outcomes for people on low incomes (including people with disabilities), and help ensure that everyone shares in Ontario’s economic growth.

We also convened an Income Security Reform Working Group and parallel working groups with First Nations and urban Indigenous partners beginning in 2016 to develop a multi-year roadmap for an income security system that is based on equity, adequacy, sustainability and simplicity. The roadmap was released for public comment on November 2, 2017, and will be used as a guide to develop a plan for early 2018.

This past June I was pleased to join my colleagues, the Honourable Tracy MacCharles, the Minister Responsible for Accessibility, and the Honourable Deb Matthews, Minister of Advanced Education and Skills Development to launch Access Talent: Ontario’s Employment Strategy for People with Disabilities. The strategy aims to increase employment for people with disabilities while also helping to connect employers to new talent that can grow their businesses. The strategy calls on employers with 20 or more employees to hire at least one more person with a disability, which would increase employment for people with disabilities looking for work by 30 per cent, connecting approximately 56,000 people to jobs. The strategy also commits to strengthening a range of education, skills development, and employment programs to help support people with disabilities succeed.

Ontario is also moving ahead to implement recommendations of the Highly Skilled Workforce Panel, included in their report ‘Building the Workforce of Tomorrow: A Shared Responsibility’, in order to build on world-class skills, education and training systems to help people obtain and create jobs of the future.

While we know that there is more to do, we will continue to work closely with our federal partners to ensure a new era of labour market agreements that reflect today’s economy and help provide the right skills that people need. We will continue to focus on the unique employment needs of persons with disabilities in order to build a better future for all people in Ontario.

The Honourable Dr. Helena Jaczek

Minister of Community and Social Services


Introduction

Under the current Canada-Ontario Labour Market Agreement for Persons with Disabilities (LMAPD)', the federal government contributes up to 50% of the cost of Ontario’s programs and services that meet the LMAPD objectives, up to a maximum federal contribution of $76.4 million.

The LMAPD objectives are:

  • Enhancing the employability of people with disabilities;
  • Increasing the employment opportunities available to people with disabilities; and
  • Demonstrating the best possible results to Canadians on investments made under the LMAPD as evidenced by enhanced employability and increased labour market participation of people with disabilities.

Ontario offers a broad suite of programs and services to respond to the diverse experiences and aspirations of people with disabilities to prepare for, find and maintain employment. The LMAPD programs and expenditures represent only a small fraction of Ontario’s investments in employment supports for people with disabilities. The LMAPD-funded programs and services are:

  • The Ministry of Community and Social Services’ Developmental Services Employment Services;
  • The Ministry of Community and Social Services’ Ontario Disability Support Program Employment Supports program, and employment benefits and the monthly earnings exemption under the income support component of the Ontario Disability Support Program; and,
  • The Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development’s (MAESD) Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities (AFSD).

These programs and services target resources towards supporting the efforts of individuals with disabilities facing complex barriers such as entering or returning to the labour market after long-term unemployment, or supporting the efforts of students with disabilities to access the opportunities available in post-secondary education.

Our Results

In this year’s Annual Report, Ontario is reporting on indicators set out in the provisions of the 2014 LMAPD. This data is derived from ministry and service provider databases. The performance indicators help to describe the experience of individuals reached by programs funded under the Agreement and reflect the achievements and experiences of persons with disabilities who have benefited from these programs.

This year, participant surveys used to collect qualitative information related to ODSP Employment Supports, ODSP Employment Benefits, and Developmental Services Employment Services program indicators were not deployed due to work underway on the ministry’s Social Assistance Performance Measurement Framework and associated survey, which is slated for release in 2018 and will include questions related to existing indicators as well as questions in the new Workforce Development Agreement Performance Measurement Framework. A quality of life survey is also planned for Developmental Services, which will focus on measuring personal outcomes including relevant questions on employment

More information regarding the 2016-17 LMAPD performance indicators can be found in the appendix of this report.

Supporting the Inclusion of all Ontarians

Ontario is known around the world as an accessibility leader. The landmark Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) has set an ambitious aim for the province - accessibility by 2025. The AODA requires nearly 400,000 businesses and organizations to remove barriers that would prevent people with disabilities from accessing goods and services. It includes standards that set a base level of accessibility in key areas of daily life, including information and communications, customer service, transportation, design of public spaces, and employment. As of January 1, 2017, all organizations and businesses with more than one employee in Ontario are required to make their employment practices accessible to job applicants and staff with disabilities according to the Accessible Employment Standard.

Ontario is continuing with its comprehensive reform of social assistance in the context of the broader income security system with the goals of reducing poverty, supporting efforts for individuals to participate in the economy, and providing human services in a way that makes sense to the people who need them.

Increasing Employment and Participation

Access Talent: Ontario’s Employment Strategy for People with Disabilities

Access Talent is Ontario’s strategy to increase employment for people with disabilities. The strategy commitments will help broaden the scope of talent for Ontario employers and businesses, positioning them for growth in an increasingly diverse province and world. The strategy challenges every Ontario employer with 20 or more employees to hire at least one more person with a disability. About 56,000 people would get jobs, and 30% of the people with disabilities looking for work in Ontario would be able to apply their talents to our businesses and economy. This represents a substantial workforce, with the potential to influence our economy and society in vibrant and meaningful ways.

The Pillars of Access Talent: Ontario’s Strategic Areas of Focus are:

1. Start Early - inspire and support youth and students with disabilities.

Access Talent is focused on linking more youth to community supports, local employers, and career-focused educational programming. Young people of all abilities benefit from work experience. Evidence demonstrates that early work experience while in school can lead to increased school completion rates, improved secondary-to-postsecondary and school-to-work transitions, and higher future earnings. This is especially true for youth with disabilities, who often have a harder time connecting with employers. The multiple barriers they face include limited work experience, inadequate support when transitioning from school, and insufficient career preparation. The unemployment rate for youth with disabilities in Ontario was reported to be about 30% in 2012, almost double that recorded by youth without disabilities. Access Talent aims to connect more youth to community supports, local employers, and career-focused educational programming.

2. Engage - support and encourage employers as champions and partners.

Making workplaces accessible and educating employers is essential to increasing employment for people with disabilities. Ontario has brought together business and non-profit leaders from across the province to form a new Employers’ Partnership Table. On September 27, this influential and dynamic group met for the first time, and will advise the government on innovative ways to include more people with disabilities in our workforce. The Employers’ Partnership Table represents an important next step to increase employment for people with disabilities.

3. Integrate - create seamless, person-centered employment and training services.

People with disabilities and employers can experience frustration in the face of complex and uncoordinated employment and training services. People with disabilities and employers want a seamless, easy-to-access system that can meet their specific needs - whether that involves skills upgrading, higher intensity employment help, or straightforward information about available jobs and candidates. Access Talent aims for a person-centered lens for employment and training services—one guided by an individual’s interests and strengths. This will help connect people to jobs that match their aspirations and skills.

4. Trail blaze - establish the Ontario government as a leading employer and change agent.

As a Top 100 Employer in Canada, and one of the country’s Best Diversity Employers and Top Employers for Young People, the Ontario Government is in an optimal position to lead by example as an employer. The government will take a proactive role in shifting the culture, attitudes and perceptions of employers and the general public. It will also adopt innovative policies that build inclusion into all aspects of its operations.

Supported Employment program

One of the key actions included in the Strategy is the measured and phased approach to implementation of a new Supported Employment program for people with disabilities who have high support needs. The first phase will be implemented in April 2018 and will be offered in three communities. Feedback from service providers, the broader community, external stakeholder working groups, and individuals accessing the program will inform improvements or adjustments, if needed, before additional phases are implemented. All existing providers who deliver MCSS’ ODSP Employment Supports, MAESD’s Ontario Employment Assistance Services, and the Ministry of Health and Long-term Care’s Mental Health Vocational Employment Supports services in Phase 1 communities have been given the opportunity to participate in Supported Employment.

In addition, under the Supporting Youth and Students pillar of the strategy, MCSS is piloting a collaborative service planning and case management approach to support the employment goals and aspirations of youth with disabilities. The pilot is currently under development and is expected to launch in 2018-19.

Highly Skilled Workforce Strategy

Through the Highly Skilled Workforce (HSW) Strategy, Ontario will continue to provide people of all abilities and backgrounds, including people with disabilities, opportunities to develop their talents, knowledge and skills to benefit from, and contribute to, an evolving economy. We are also investing in providing labour market information through a new website to help individuals and employers make decisions, such as choosing a career, developing educational and training programs, or undertaking workforce planning.

Basic Income Pilot

Economic stability remains one of the core challenges for many people living in Ontario, particularly for people with disabilities. In spring 2017, based on direction in Ontario’s 2017 Budget and the 2016 mandate letter of the Minister of Community and Social Services, the province launched the three-year Basic Income Pilot as a different approach to income security and reducing poverty in order to better support vulnerable workers, improve health and education outcomes for people on low incomes, and help ensure that everyone shares in Ontario’s economic growth.

The Pilot is currently underway in four communities; Hamilton, Brantford, Brant County, Lindsay and Thunder Bay, and will provide a monthly payment to approximately 4,000 eligible families or individuals, thereby ensuring a minimum income level whether participants are employed or unemployed. Participants in the Pilot will be able to increase their total income by combining a basic income with income they earn through work.

An advisory group with research and evaluation expertise, led by Dr. Kwame McKenzie, CEO of the Wellesley Institute and Special Advisor to the Ontario Basic Income Pilot, and comprised of researchers from St. Michael’s Hospital and McMaster University, was convened in October 2017 to ensure the Pilot is conducted with the utmost integrity, rigour and ethical standards, and will measure both the short, medium and long-term outcomes of a basic income for participants. The Pilot is an important piece of research to complement important elements of Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy; lessons from the Pilot will help to inform our longer-term plans for income security reform.

Income Security Reform

To assist low-income Ontarians in reaching their full potential, the province committed to develop a plan to reform social assistance within the context of the broader income security system and aligned with efforts to combat poverty.

To begin the process, in June 2016, Ontario announced the establishment of the Income Security Reform Working Group, facilitated by former judge and provincial Deputy Minister George Thomson and comprised of service delivery partners, advocates and people with lived experience. As well, in January 2017, the province also established the First Nations Income Security Working Group and the Urban Indigenous Table on Income Security Reform to ensure the Roadmap recognizes the unique experience of all Ontarians.

These Working Groups were tasked with the development of a multi-year Roadmap to recommend tangible changes and improvements to Ontario’s income security system based on principles such as equity, adequacy, sustainability and simplicity. Their work included broad conversations about relevant issues such as economic and social inclusion, health, income and housing.

The Working Groups’ advice to government to guide decisions for a multi-year plan of reform was released on November 2, 2017 as “Income Security Reform: A Roadmap for Change”. The roadmap was posted online for a 60-day period, and the broader public was invited to provide feedback to inform the development of an approved implementation plan.

In the meantime, the province’s 2017 Budget included an investment of more than $480 million over four years in social assistance to further increase social assistance rates.

Supporting Innovative Solutions

To support agencies providing services - including employment supports - for persons with disabilities, Ontario recently announced the successful projects from the second round of the Developmental Services Employment and Modernization Fund (EMF). The EMF offers financial support to projects that promote greater inclusion and independence for people with developmental disabilities.  The Fund promotes sector innovation and collaboration to make services and supports more person-centred and responsive. Preference is given to projects with transformative potential that have a long-term impact beyond the end of the fund.

Funded proposals have included projects that assist with the shift towards competitive employment for individuals with developmental disabilities and enable people to pursue real work for real pay in mainstream workplaces.

For example, an initiative in North Bay involves collaboration between six agencies in Northern Ontario to improve employment outcomes for individuals graduating from high school and college, or participating in day programs. This will involve training agency staff and collaboration between the agencies to implement a pre-employment training model and support people to obtain summer or part-time employment. In another, in Cambridge, the agency will identify and develop employer champions within the community. This will involve an awareness campaign for businesses, followed by targeted outreach. The agency will also provide supports and coaching for champion organizations and follow-up with job development where employers are ready to hire.

Similarly, several initiatives funded through Ontario’s Local Poverty Reduction Fund have supported organizations and communities to tackle poverty and increase employment amongst persons with disabilities. In 2016, an organization in Essex received funding to evaluate the impact of its modernized employment service, Career Compass, which approaches employers and markets job-seekers with disabilities on a business, rather than social service, level.  This work will impact the lives of 300 people with disabilities in Windsor/Essex by helping them move toward meaningful employment and income security within a diverse and inclusive workplace.

Working Together

Ontario is encouraged by recent federal announcements to develop a federal poverty reduction strategy and accessibility legislation that align with and build on, Ontario’s investments.

At the Forum for Labour Market Ministers (FLMM) meeting on October 24, 2017 federal, provincial and territorial Labour Market Ministers confirmed that governments are working together to make changes to labour market agreements that will:

  • Foster inclusive labour market participation
  • Align skills with labour market needs
  • Support the creation of efficient labour markets

As well, we look forward to working with the federal government on shaping the future of federal investments where they can best support access to good quality job opportunities for all Ontarians with disabilities. This was highlighted in Ontario’s recent submission to the federal Parliamentary Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities (HUMA) in February 2017, in which Ontario recommended greater partnership between Canada and Ontario to achieve greater cumulative impact and positive outcomes for persons with disabilities through increased labour market attachment and by connecting initiatives, policies and programs.

Ontario’s goal is to continue to work with the federal government, Ontarians with disabilities, employers and all partners to determine ways to improve employment supports in a way that makes sense for people with disabilities and removes barriers to employment. In realizing the social and economic participation of all Ontarians, we welcome the federal government as a strong partner to support a dedicated, collective impact on improving the pathways to employment, and the equitable representation in the workforce of all Ontarians, including those who have to overcome the barriers associated with disability.


Section 1: Ministry of Community and Social Services

The general policy intent of Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) interventions is to help people with disabilities to successfully pursue their employment goals. Together, the interventions provide a range of supports for individuals at different points along the employment continuum.

Ontario Disability Support Program - Employment Supports

The employment supports component of ODSP provides employment assistance to people with disabilities who are interested in preparing for, obtaining, and maintaining competitive employment. ODSP employment supports is delivered by a network of approximately 150 service providers across the province that provide a range of services to support competitive employment, such a. job coaching, on-the-job training, job placement and retention, and assistive devices and the training to use them.

Ontario Disability Support Program - Employment Benefits

The income support component of ODSP provides financial assistance to eligible people with disabilities and their families. This includes benefits to help people with disabilities find and maintain employment. Employment-related benefits include:

  • Work-related Benefit (WRB): $100 per month for adults who have earnings from employment, a training program, or net positive income from a business, to assist with the incidental costs of work (e.g. transportation).
  • Employment and Training Start-up Benefit (ESUB): funding up to $500 in a 12-month period can be provided to assist with the cost of starting employment, a training program, or an approved activity that will assist the person to become and stay employed. . Eligible expenses include, but are not limited to:
    • work wear, uniforms;
    • tools and equipment;
    • grooming costs;
    • transportation;
    • licensing fees and association costs; and
    • application fee for General Education Development test.
  • Employment Transition Benefit (ETB): A person who exits ODSP because he/she is no longer financially eligible for income support due to their earnings is eligible for a lump-sum $500 payment upon exit. The intent of the benefit is to mitigate the loss of the monthly $100 work-related benefit and to help with work-related costs in the initial months after leaving ODSP.

Ontario Disability Support Program - Monthly Earnings Exemption

The $200 earnings exemption is designed to encourage people to find and maintain employment. As an income exemption, it reduces the amount of monthly net earnings deducted from an earner’s monthly income support payment, thereby increasing the person’s level of overall monthly income.

The ODSP monthly earnings exemption scheme fully exempts the first $200 of monthly net earnings from employment, a training program or net positive income from the operation of a business.  Every dollar of net earnings above $200 is deducted at 50% (i.e., 50 cents of each dollar). Only the $200 full exemption is submitted for cost-sharing under the LMAPD.

In respect of this intervention and as reflected in Ontario’s performance indicators, the $200 earnings exemption is not time-limited. For example, a person may have started receiving the earnings exemption in the previous year(s), depending on when they started working. For this reason, indicators 2, 3, 7 and 8 include persons who received the intervention at any point during the reporting year (2016-17) rather than at the point of pre-intervention). Further, a person’s earnings may be periodic throughout the reporting year, and therefore, so would the intervention.

Developmental Services - Employment Supports

Developmental services employment services help people with developmental disabilities prepare for, find, and maintain employment. A range of supports are provided including pre-employment training, skills development, job coaching and supported employment.

In the fall of 2015, Ontario committed to shift away from sheltered workshops and move towards inclusive, competitive employment in the community. Since then, the ministry has been working with its funded agencies in the developmental services sector to support the transition away from sheltered workshops and similar programs to employment in mainstream workplaces as well as a range of meaningful activities in their communities. In addition, Ontario is proposing to remove the exclusion of simulated work environments from the Employment Standards Act through Bill 148, the Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act 2017.

As part of the second call for proposals under the Employment and Modernization Fund, Ontario invested over $7 million in 38 projects starting in 2017-18. One of the main goals of this fund is to improve employment outcomes for people with developmental disabilities and enable them to pursue real work for real pay in mainstream workplaces, by supporting initiatives to improve the quality and effectiveness of employment support programs. The fund also promotes sector innovation and collaboration to make services and supports more person-centred and responsive. Preference is given to projects with transformative potential that have a long-term impact beyond the end of the fund.


Section 2: Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development

The Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities provides funding to assist publicly-funded postsecondary institutions to meet their legal obligations to people with disabilities.

Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities

The Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities assists colleges and universities with costs related to the operation of offices for students with disabilities. This includes a wide range of services and accommodations such as transitions programming, arranging note-taking support for students with visual impairments, providing access to computers and appropriate technological learning aids and working with faculty to arrange extra time to write tests and exams for students with disabilities.


Section 3: Program Expenditures

LMAPD Eligible Program Final eligible Expenditures
($ Millions)
1
2015-2016
Final eligible Expenditures
($ Millions)1
2016-17
Ministry of Community and Social Services    
ODSP: Employment Supports 35.5 36.4
ODSP: Employment benefits (Work-Related Benefit, Employment-Start-Up Benefit and Employment Transition Benefit)2 40 42.8
ODSP: Monthly Earning Exemption 54.0 56.4
Developmental Services - Employment Supports 27.7 27.3
Sub-Total 157.2 162.9
Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities    
Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities and the Enhanced Services Fund 32.5 32.6
Sub-Total 32.5 32.6
Administration Cost @ 10% of the total Provincial Expenditures 19.0 19.5
Total Expenditures 208.7 215
Federal Contribution 76.4 76.4

1 - Figures shown as sub-totals may differ from the sum of listed program expenditures due to rounding.
2 - Note: a portion of these benefits is claimed under the Canada-Ontario Job Fund Agreement. The above expenditure represents only the portion of the benefits that is cost-shared under the LMAPD.

 


Appendix: Performance Indicators

Ontario is reporting on relevant program performance indicators consistent with the provisions of the 2014 LMAPD.

Methodology

Program data sources include MCSS’ Employment Supports Management System and the Social Assistance Management System, where the data was available.

Intervention: ODSP Employment Supports

Indicator 1: Number of individuals served by intervention type in 2016/17.

Description Number of Individuals Served
Individuals placed in employment or started a business and received ongoing services and supports to retain3 employment or a business this fiscal year 2,397
Individuals placed in employment or started a business in the previous fiscal year and received ongoing retention services and supports in this fiscal year 3,616
Employed Individuals who were provided retention services and supports to manage a job crisis in this fiscal year 454
Employed Individuals who were provided services and supports to pursue job advancement in this fiscal year 139

3 - Although the 13 week job placement requirement and 33 month retention period amounts to three years, the length of time an individual is typically in the program is longer. The duration is determined by the length of time an individual requires to reach the job placement criteria i.e., 13 weeks of cumulative work.

Indicator 2: For those unemployed pre-intervention, number of Individuals by pre-intervention education, gender, age

Response: Number of individuals placed/started a business and provided ongoing employment retention supports4

  Clients placed/started a business in this fiscal year Clients placed/started a business in previous fiscal year
Education Level    
Completed university 99 36
Some university 64 21
Completed college 425 713
Some college 161 74
Completed apprenticeship 9 1
Completed high-school 815 1413
Some high-school 431 793
Less than high-school 130 124
Unknown 197 152
Gender    
Male 1390 2045
Female 969 1445
Not provided 38 38
Age    
15-29 947 1238
30-54 1127 1912
55-64 278 395
65 or older 14 28
Not provided 31 43
Average monthly hours and earnings    
Avg. monthly hours 58 61
Avg. monthly earnings $654 $717

4 - Ibid

Indicator 3: For those employed pre-intervention, number of individuals by pre-intervention hours worked, hourly earnings, education, gender, age

Response Number of Individuals
Education Level  
Completed university 25
Some university 10
Completed college 110
Some college 32
Completed apprenticeship 3
Completed high-school 241
Some high-school 102
Less than high-school 14
Unknown 27
Gender  
Male 307
Female 274
Not provided 8
Age  
15-29 145
30-54 300
55-64 117
65 or older 24
Not provided 7
Average monthly hours and earnings  
Avg. monthly hours worked 72
Avg. monthly earnings $760

Indicator 4: Proportion who earn credentials/certification as a result of intervention, by intervention type5

Not available in 2016-17.

5 - Earning a credential/certification is not a key objective of ODSP employment supports and therefore not a meaningful measure of this program.

Indicator 5: Proportion who indicate career advancement (e.g., promotion, increased responsibilities, better wages) as a result of intervention, by intervention type

Client Description Number of clients6
Employed clients who were provided services and supports to pursue job advancement in this fiscal year 139

6 - Ontario reported on the “number of individuals” for 2016-17 for this indicator and will report on the “proportion of individuals” in future years.

Indicator 6: Proportion who indicate they are prepared for new or better employment as a result of intervention, by intervention type

Not available in 2016-17.

Indicator 7: For those unemployed pre-intervention, proportion of individuals by employment status at 3 and 12 months post-intervention (employed/unemployed, hours worked, hourly earnings), by intervention

Description 3 month follow-up
# of clients employed7
3 month follow-up
Avg. monthly hours
3 month follow-up
Avg. monthly earnings
12 month follow-up
# of clients employed
12 month follow-up
Avg. monthly hours
12 month follow-up
Avg. monthly earnings
Individuals placed in employment or started a business and received ongoing services and supports to retain8 employment or a business this fiscal year 1782 67 $721 443 72.61 714.95
Individuals placed in employment or started a business previous fiscal year and received ongoing services and supports to retai. employment or a business this fiscal year 2964 63 $753 2774 66 $778

7 - Ontario reported on the “number of individuals” for 2016-17 for this indicator and will report on the “proportion of individuals” in future years.

8 - Although the 13 week job placement requirement and 33 month retention period amounts to three years, the length of time an individual is typically in the program is longer. The duration is determined by the length of time an individual requires to reach the job placement criteria i.e., 13 weeks of cumulative work.

Indicator 8: For those employed pre-intervention, proportion of individuals by employment status at 3 and 12 months post-intervention (employed/unemployed, hours worked, hourly earnings), by intervention type

Client Description 3 month follow-up
# of clients employed9
3 month follow-up
Avg. monthly hours
3 month follow-up
Avg. monthly earnings
12 month follow-up
# of clients employed
12 month follow-up
Avg. monthly hours
12 month follow-up
Avg. monthly earnings
Individuals who were provided services and supports to retain employment/a business or to pursue career advancement 507 81 $779 355 76 $785

Indicator 9: Proportion of individuals indicating employment is closely related to educational background/work undertaken during intervention

Not available in 2016-17.

Indicator 10: Proportion of individuals satisfied with intervention, by intervention type

Not available in 2016-17.

9 - Ontario reported on the “number of individuals” for 2016-17 for this indicator and will report on the “proportion of individuals” in future years.

Interventions: ODSP Employment Benefits and $200 Monthly Earnings Exemption

ODSP’s employment benefits include:

  • Work-related Benefit (WRB)
  • Employment Start-up Benefit (ESUB)  and
  • Employment Transition Benefit (ETB)

Unlike time-limited interventions (e.g., pre-employment training or apprenticeship programs), ODSP employment benefits and the monthly earnings exemption are ongoing or periodic interventions that, together, provide supports for people with disabilities at different points along the employability continuum.

For this reason, Ontario is reporting on people who received an intervention during the reporting year rather than at point of pre-intervention, as in many cases, the point of pre-intervention may not fall within the reporting year (e.g., the person may have been working and receiving the earnings exemption and the work-related benefit for the past two years).

Indicator 1: Number of individuals served by intervention type in 2016/17

Program Number of individuals served Total
WRB 48,325  
ESUB 19,992  
ETB 18  
ODSP Employment Benefits (total)   68,335
ODSP Monthly Earnings Exemption 45,201 45,201

Indicator 2 (alternative indicator): Number of distinct individuals with a disability who received the intervention at least once during the fiscal year by education, gender and age.

Response Number of Individuals
WRB
Number of Individuals
ESUB
Number of Individuals
ETB
Number of Individuals
EE
Education Level        
Less than high school 4,870 1,205 0 4,571
High school 31,088 13,393 13 29,456
Post-secondary 12,072 5,271 5 10,949
Unknown 295 123 0 225
Gender        
Male 26,083 10,326 9 24,828
Female 22,242 9,666 9 20,373
Age        
15-29 12,632 5,060 4 13,293
30-54 27,648 12,390 14 25,359
55-64 7,811 2,493 0 6,399
65 or older 234 49 0 150
Average monthly earnings        
Less than $100 12,908 15,185 5 6,508
$100.01 - $200 5,202 765 0 5,742
$200.01 - $300 3,626 593 0 4,023
$300.01 - $400 2,890 442 0 3,233
$400.01 - $500 2,667 351 0 2,947
$500.01 and over 21,032 2656 13 22,748

Indicator 3: For those employed pre-intervention, number of individuals by pre-intervention hours worked, hourly earnings, education, gender, age

Please see indicator #2.

Indicator 4: Proportion who earn credentials/certification as a result of intervention, by intervention type

Not available in 2016-17.

Indicator 5: Proportion who indicate career advancement (e.g., promotion, increased responsibilities, better wages) as a result of intervention, by intervention type

Indicator 6: Proportion who indicate they are prepared for new or better employment as a result of intervention, by intervention type10

Not available in 2016-17.

10 - Preparation for new/better employment is not a key objective of ODSP employment benefits or the ODSP monthly earnings exemption and therefore not a meaningful measure of these programs

Indicator 7: For those unemployed pre-intervention, proportion of individuals by employment status at 3 and 12 months post-intervention (employed/unemployed, hours worked, hourly earnings), by intervention

For ODSP employment benefits, Ontario is only reporting on the employment status of people who received ESUB only. To receive WRB and ETB, individuals must be already employed at the time the benefit is provided. Further, ETB is paid when a person exits ODSP, and Ontario cannot track persons who received ETB once they have exited the social assistance system for employment. Therefore, this indicator applies only to persons who received ESUB and who may or may not have earnings in the month they receive ESUB.

Employment Status - ESUB Number of individuals Average monthly earnings of individuals
Individuals who were not employed in month ESUB received (Apr16), but had earnings the following month (May16) 223 486

Individuals who were not employed in month ESUB received (Apr16), but had earnings in at least one of the following 3 months (May16 to Jul16) 

432 639

Individuals who were not employed in month ESUB received (Apr16), but had earnings in at least one of the following 6 months (May16 to Oct16)

512 660

Individuals who were not employed in month ESUB received (Apr16), but had earnings in at least one of the following 12 months (May16 to Apr17)

582 678

Individuals who were not employed in month prior to month ESUB received (Mar16), but had earnings in month ESUB received (Apr16)

124 497

As noted previously, the ODSP monthly earnings exemption is not time-limited. A person may receive the exemption on an ongoing or periodic basis. As a person is eligible for the earnings exemption every month that they report earnings, Ontario is reporting on the alternative indicator below.

Alternative Indicator: Average monthly earnings of individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption per month within the fiscal year

Employment Status - Earnings Exemption Number of individuals Avg. monthly earnings of clients
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 12 months of the year 13,095 578
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 11 months of the year 4,146 702
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 10 months of the year 2,942 823
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 9 months of the year 2,317 795
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 8 months of the year 2,005 792
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 7 months of the year 1,975 766
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 6 months of the year 2,241 749
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 5 months of the year 2,513 721
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 4 months of the year 2,667 712
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 3 months of the year 3,080 678
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 2 months of the year 3,428 618
Number of distinct individuals who were eligible for the earnings exemption 1 months of the year 4,792 555

Indicator 8: For those employed pre-intervention, proportion of individuals by employment status at 3 and 12 months post-intervention (employed/ unemployed, hours worked, hourly earnings), by intervention type

See indicator #7.11

11 - Given the long-term nature of ODSP employment benefits and the ODSP monthly earnings exemption Ontario did not collect data pre-intervention. See indicator #7 for results showing employment status.

Indicator 9: Proportion of individuals indicating employment is closely related to educational background/work undertaken during intervention

Not available in 2016-17.

Indicator 10: Proportion of individuals satisfied with intervention, by intervention type

Not available in 2016-17.

Intervention: Developmental Services Employment Services

Methodology

Administrative data was used to report on Indicator 1 (number of people served).

Indicator 1: Number of individuals served by intervention type in 2016-17.

3818 individuals were served by the Developmental Services Employment Supports program in 2016-17.

Indicator 2: For those unemployed pre-intervention, number of individuals by pre-intervention education, gender, age

Reporting on gender is not available in 2016-17. As agreed to by the federal government, Ontario is not reporting on education level as this is not a meaningful measure of the program’s objectives.
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Indicator 3: For those employed pre-intervention, number of individuals by pre-intervention hours worked, hourly earnings, education, gender, age

Not Applicable. Ontario does not collect data on this indicator as individuals already competitively employed would typically not be prioritized to receive developmental services employment supports.  As a result, there would be very few, if any, individuals employed prior to participating in the program.

Indicator 4: Proportion who earn credentials/certification as a result of intervention, by intervention type

Not Applicable. Ontario does not collect data on this indicator for developmental services employment supports as earning a credential/certification is not a key objective of this program and therefore not a meaningful measure of this program.

Indicator 5: Proportion who indicate career advancement (e.g., promotion, increased responsibilities, better wages) as a result of intervention, by intervention type

Not Applicable. Ontario does not collect data on this indicator as career advancement is not a key objective of the developmental services and employment supports program and therefore not a meaningful measure of this program.

Indicator 6: Proportion who indicate they are prepared for new or better employment as a result of intervention, by intervention type

Not available in 2016-17.

Indicator 7: For those unemployed pre-intervention, proportion of individuals by employment status at 3 and 12 months post-intervention (employed/unemployed, hours worked, hourly earnings), by intervention

Not available in 2016-17.

Indicator 8: For those employed pre-intervention, proportion of individuals by employment status at 3 and 12 months post-intervention (employed/unemployed, hours worked, hourly earnings), by intervention type

Not Applicable. Ontario does not collect data on this indicator as individuals already competitively employed would typically not be prioritized to receive developmental services employment supports. As a result, there would be very few, if any, individuals employed prior to participating in the program.

Indicator 9: Proportion of individuals indicating employment is closely related to educational background/work undertaken during intervention

Not available in 2016-17.

Indicator 10: Proportion of individuals satisfied with intervention, by intervention type

Not available in 2016-17.

Intervention: Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities

Indicators 1 and 2 were collected from publically-assisted postsecondary institutions as part of their annual Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities report to the ministry.

For Indicators 4, 8 and 9, data pertaining to colleges is from the 2016-17 Graduate Outcomes Survey. The Graduate Outcomes Survey is a telephone survey conducted by a third party service provider six months after graduation. An attempt is made to contact every graduate, even if they are residing out of the province. The Survey asks graduates about their activities after graduation. Completing these surveys is voluntary. 99,365 college graduates were eligible to be surveyed with a response rate of 42%.

Employment outcomes of university graduates of undergraduate and second-entry professional programs were obtained from the 2016 Ontario University Graduate Survey, which reports on 2014 graduates. The survey is conducted by a third party service provider and may be completed online or by paper. The survey asks graduates about their employment situation six months and twenty-four months after graduation. Survey participation, as well as disability self-identification, is voluntary. 83,521 university graduates were eligible to participate in the 2016 survey, which had a completion rate of 40.75%. Of this, 3% of survey respondents self-identified as having a disability.

For Indicator 10, data pertaining to colleges comes from the 2016-17 Student Satisfaction Survey. The Student Satisfaction Survey is conducted during classroom time, with students filling out an anonymous paper survey. The survey asks students to indicate their satisfaction with the overall quality of their learning experience. Completing the survey is voluntary. There were 131,760 respondents this year.

Indicator 1: Number of individuals served by intervention type in 2016/17.

Individuals Number of Individuals Served
University students 36,831
College students 37,205
Total 74,036

Indicator 2 (alternative indicator): Number of individuals by education, gender, age (regardless of pre-employment status)

Response - Gender Number of individuals served - University Students Number of individuals served - College Students
Male 13,789 14,993
Female 21,562 21,886
Other 29 63
Undisclosed 1,451 263
Age    
Less than 20 12,225 13,439
21-30 20,315 17,126
31-40 2,354 3,651
41-50 889 1,884
51-60 373 797
61 and above 137 95
Undisclosed 508 213

Education Level:

Response University - Number of individuals served
Bachelor Degrees 32,264
Masters Degrees 1,896
Ph.D and Doctorate 536
Diploma/Certificate 156
Other Credential Type 1,979


Response College
. Number of individuals served
Ontario College Certificate 5,421
Ontario College Diploma 17,566
Ontario College Advanced Diploma 6,630
Ontario College Graduate Certificate 1,000
Baccalaureate Degree in an Applied Field of Study 2,867
Certificate of Apprenticeship 76
Other credential type 3,645

Indicator 3: For those employed pre-intervention, number of individuals by pre-intervention hours worked, hourly earnings, education, gender, age

Not Applicable. Ontario does not collect data on this indicator as the Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities is designed to support academic attainment, not immediate employment outcomes.

Indicator 4: Proportion who earn credentials/certification as a result of intervention, by intervention type12

Response College Graduates
Yes 76%
Yes, Somewhat 15%
No 9%

12 - Data on this indicator is not yet available for university graduates.

Indicator 5: Proportion who indicate career advancement (e.g., promotion, increased responsibilities, better wages) as a result of intervention, by intervention type

Not Applicable. Ontario does not collect data on this indicator as the Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities is designed to support academic attainment, not immediate employment outcomes.

Indicator 6: Proportion who indicate they are prepared for new or better employment as a result of intervention, by intervention type

Not Applicable. Ontario does not collect data on this indicator as the Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities is designed to support academic attainment, not immediate employment outcomes.

Indicator 7: For those unemployed pre-intervention, proportion of individuals by employment status at 3 and 12 months post-intervention (employed/unemployed, hours worked, hourly earnings), by intervention

Not Applicable. Ontario does not collect data on this indicator as the Accessibility Fund for Students with Disabilities is designed to support academic attainment, not immediate employment outcomes.

Indicator 8 (alternative indicator): Proportion of individuals by employment status at 6 months and 24 months after graduation (employed/unemployed, full-time/part-time, and salary)

Response University Students - 6 months after graduation College Students - 6 months after graduation13
Employment Rate    
Percentage employed 85% 73%
Was your employment for 30 hours a week or more?    
Yes 59% 71%
Average Annual Salary    
Mean $30,567 $28,622


Response University Students - 24 months after graduation14 College Students - 24 months after graduation15
Employment Rate    
Percentage employed 91% NA
Was your employment for 30 hours a week or more?    
Yes 67% NA
Average Annual Salary    
Mean $36,643 NA

Indicator 9: Proportion of individuals indicating employment is closely related to educational background/work undertaken during intervention

Response College Graduates 6 months after graduation
Yes 51%


Response University Students - 6 months after graduation University Graduates - 24 months after Graduation
Yes 53% 62%

Indicator 10: Proportion of individuals satisfied with intervention, by intervention type

Description College Students - Proportion of individuals satisfied with the Office of Students with Disabilities30
Usage Satisfaction Rate
High use individuals31 84%
Low use individuals 61%

13 - This data reports on college students who self-identified as having a disability and indicated they registered with their Office for Students with Disabilities. It should be compared with caution to other indicators. Reporting on colleges at 24 months is not yet available.

14 - This data reports on university students who self-identified as having a disability and graduated in 2014. It should be compared with caution to other indicators. 

15 - This data reports on college students who self-identified as having a disability and indicated they registered with their Office for Students with Disabilities. It should be compared with caution to other indicators. Reporting on colleges at 24 months is not yet available. 

Indicator 10: Proportion of individuals satisfied with intervention, by intervention type

Description College Students – Proportion of individuals satisfied with the Office of Students with Disabilities16
Usage Satisfaction Rate
High use individuals17 84%
Low use individuals 61%

16 - This indicator only reports on respondents to the Student Satisfaction Survey who indicated they had used services from their Office for Students with Disabilities. Note: data applies to college students only. Information is not currently collected for university students or graduates.  Data for university students will be provided in December 2018.

17 - Respondents to the Student Satisfaction Survey were asked to indicate their usage of college services for students with disabilities. Respondents who indicated high or low usage are provided above.