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Where can I find more information to help me plan a good life?

There are many resources you can use to get further information on how to create a person-directed plan. Some of them are planning methods, and others are more general books and guides on person-directed planning.

Person-Directed (Centred) Planning Resources

A Good Life: For You and Your Relative with a Disability

A Good Life was developed by Al Etmanski in 2000, and is designed for families. This book is intended to motivate, inspire and challenge you to begin and complete a planning process for your relative.

You can obtain this book from Planned Lifetime Advocacy Network (PLAN - www.plan.ca), 101-3790 Canada Way, Burnaby, BC, V5G 1G4

Person Centred Planning Guide Book

This guide book was developed in 2004 to give an overview of person-centred planning that is occurring in Alberta. The guide contains family stories, information on the policy work completed to-date, and a summary of the work that still needs to be done.

You can order or obtain this book online from Persons with Developmental Disabilities Central Alberta Community Board (www.pdd.org), #501, 5010-43 St., Red Deer, AB, T4N 6H2, Ph: (403) 340-5003.

Planning On … A Resource Book for Facilitators

Planning On was developed by Susannah Joyce in 2000. It is a resource book for facilitators and outlines a step-by-step process of person centred planning.

You can obtain this book from Realizations Training and Resources, P.O Box 1430, Station B, London, ON, N6A 5M2, Tel: (519) 433-2387.

Building New Worlds: A Sourcebook for Students with Disabilities in Transition from High School to Adult Life

This book, written by Beth Mount and Connie Lyle O'Brien, captures the transitional process that students with disabilities experience as they leave high school. It also chronicles the ways in which people with disabilities and their allies have worked together to ensure an active, participatory life as valued citizens in the community.

This resource can be obtained from Capacity Works (www.capacityworks.com), L.L.C., PO Box 271, Amenia, NY, 12501-0271, Tel: 1-888-840-8578.

A Parents' Guide to Transition Planning

This guide was compiled by the Persons with Developmental Disabilities Central Alberta Community Board, and contains valuable information for families of individuals leaving high school. Some of the information in this guide includes lifestyle planning, funding, obtaining resources, supports, and services, guardianship, and estate planning.

You can order or obtain this book online from Persons with Developmental Disabilities Central Alberta Community Board (www.pdd.org), #501, 5010-43 St., Red Deer, AB, T4N 6H2, Tel: (403) 340-5003.

Planning Your Support

This 2004 guide was generated by a program entitled 'In Control', which is associated with Mencap, a UK-based organization for people developmental disabilities. This guide has two versions - a plain-language and a simple-language - and provides details on how to create a person-directed plan for the future.

You can obtain this document through Mencap's In Control website (www.in-control.org.uk), or via Mencap themselves (www.mencap.org.uk): 123 Golden Lane, London, England, EC1Y 0RT, Tel: (044) 020-7454-0454.

Techniques for Person-Directed (Centred) Planning

ELP: Essential Lifestyle Planning

Essential Lifestyle Planning is a way to learn how to develop a life plan for someone based on how they want to live. It ensures that a person is heard and that their wants and needs are categorized and organized into a 'user-friendly' plan.

You can obtain information on ELP by contacting The Learning Community for Essential Lifestyle Planning at http://www.elpnet.net, or Allan, Shea, and Associates, (www.allanshea.com) 1780 Third St., Napa, CA, 94559, Tel: (707) 258-1326.

MAPS: Making Action Plans

MAPS was developed by John O'Brien, Marsha Forest, Jack Pearpoint, Judith Snow and David Hasbury. This tool asks people and their families to respond to a series of planning questions to form an action plan that heads away from their nightmare and towards their dream.

You can obtain books on MAPS at Inclusion Press (www.inclusion.com), 24 Thome Cres., Toronto, ON, M6H 2S5, Ph: 416-658-5363

PATH: Planning Alternative Tomorrows with Hope

PATH was developed by John O'Brien, Marsha Forest and Jack Pearpoint. This tool uses graphics that help people find direction and build strength.

You can obtain books on PATH at Inclusion Press (www.inclusion.com), 24 Thome Cres., Toronto, ON, M6H 2S5, Tel: 416-658-5363

PFP: Personal Futures Planning

Personal Futures Planning was developed by Beth Mount, and is a set of questions and graphical maps that adjusts to the strengths and gifts of an individual. It is also used to give a sense of how these strengths and gifts could be better utilised.

You can obtain information on PFP via Graphic Futures, 25 West 81st St #16B, New York, NY, 10024, Ph: (212) 362-9492.

Discovery Planning: A Guide for Facilitators

This guide offers suggestions on facilitations, working with planning groups and building community.

You can obtain a copy of this guide through The Collective for Community Action, (519) 744-7645

Developing Leisure Identities: A Pilot Project

This book offers an insightful look into what it takes to support people with disabilities to go after their dreams, to really do what they have always imagined doing. It gives practical suggestions and reflective questions that help individuals and their families to figure out how they can be supported to get on with creating a passionate life for themselves. The book helps the reader to gain a fuller appreciation of leisure and how it can create aliveness and balance in our lives.

The book is available through Brampton-Caledon Community Living, 34 Church St. W., Brampton, Ontario L6X 1H3, Tel: (905) 453-8841.

Other Relevant Resources:

Support Circles/Networks

Friends In/Deed

This handbook focuses on planning to help people develop and sustain relationships

You can obtain this book from Realizations Training and Resources, P.O Box 1430, Station B, London, ON, N6A 5M2, Tel: (519) 433-2387.

Individualized Funding

Individualized Funding: Definition and Elements

This article was written by the Individualized Funding Coalition for Ontario in 2004, and is a useful first step for understanding the current context of IF in Ontario.

This resource can be obtained from the Individualized Funding Coalition of Ontario (www.individualizedfunding.ca), 240 Duncan Mill Rd., Suite 403, Toronto, ON, M3B 1Z4, Ph: (416) 447-4348 ext. 240.

Report of the Ontario Round Table on Individualized Funding: A Pathway to Self-Determination and Community Involvement for People with Disabilities

This report was written by John Lord, with the support of members of the Individualized Funding Coalition for Ontario in 2000. Attendees at the meeting upon which the report was based represented a number of people who had experienced individualized funding, either as an individual with a disability, family member, advocate, broker/facilitator, service provider, or researcher.

This resource can be obtained from the Individualized Funding Coalition of Ontario (www.individualizedfunding.ca), 240 Duncan Mill Rd., Suite 403, Toronto, ON, M3B 1Z4, Tel: (416) 447-4348 ext. 240.

More Choice and Control for People with Disabilities: Individualized Support and Funding.

This review was commissioned by the Ontario Federation for Cerebral Palsy in 2000, and was written by John Lord, Barbara Zupko, and Peggy Hutchison. The purpose of the review was to develop an awareness and understanding of the strategies that could be used to build the capacity of Ontarians to implement individualized funding for people with disabilities.

This resource can be obtained from the Ontario Federation for Cerebral Palsy (www.ofcp.on.ca), 1630 Lawrence Ave. West, Suite 104, Toronto, ON, M6L 1C5, Tel: 1-877-244-9686.

Creative Community Supports

Creative Supports for Vulnerable Citizens: Papers from the Guelph Spring Conference

This 80-page book was developed from a conference held in Guelph in April 2005. It includes topics such as: Creative Supports that Work: Values, Principles and Processes by John Lord; Creating Home by Barbara Leavitt; and Building Meaningful Supports for Work and Recreation Purposes by Peggy Hutchison.
This resource can be ordered by emailing gbloomfi@uoguelph.ca

Leisure, Integration and Community (2nd edition)

This book was written by Peggy Hutchison and Judith McGill in 1998, and includes a wealth of information on how community is used as a first resource for people with disabilities. It also includes chapters on person-centred philosophies, planning for change, and the systemic resistance that often occurs when families and individuals choose to think outside of the box.

This resource can be obtained from Leisurability Publications, Ltd., through Parks and Recreation Ontario (www.prontario.com), 1185 Eglinton Ave East, Suite 406, Toronto, ON M3C 3C6, Tel: (416) 426-7142.

Shifting the Paradigm in Community Mental Health: Towards Empowerment and Community.

Although this 2001 book written by Geoff Nelson, John Lord, and Joanna Ochocka details a new model for community integration and empowerment for people with mental health issues, its values have wide applicability for other marginalized groups, such as people with disabilities. The three values are: participation and empowerment ("nothing about me without me"), community support and integration ("community is not just a place to live"); and social justice and access to valued resources ("receiving our fair share").

This book can be ordered from the University of Toronto Press Inc. (www.utpress.utoronto.ca), 5201 Dufferin St., Toronto, ON, M3H 5T8, Tel: 1-800-565-9523.

 

1 This Planning Guide is the result of information obtained from numerous resources including written materials and the experience of people with disabilities, family members, facilitators obtained in three focus group sessions.

2 Taken from "A Constellation of Tools for Change", Forest, O'Brien and Pearpoint (1999)

3 This format was modeled after the one used in 'How to Write Your Support Plan' by In Control in the UK. It is available at www.in-control.org.uk/downloads/Guide_to_Planning_eVer.doc.

4 Circles of support started in the early 1980s as people with disabilities and their families began to realize the power and importance of relationships. Judith Snow is often credited with having the first support circle in Canada. Judith's story is outlined in "Behind the Piano", Judith Snow, Jack Pearpoint (1990). Toronto: Inclusion Press.

5 More information is available in the following resource entitled "More Choice and Control For People with Disabilities," John Lord, Barbara Zupko, and Peggy Hutchison, (2000).

6 Taken from "Lifestyle Planning Process: Steps for Facilitators, Individuals, Families, and Network Planning Groups;" John Lord, (2003).